The Wonders of Hydration

Sometimes, drinking water is hard (#firstworldproblems).

Here, we highlight some facts to make it easier to chug-a-lug.

 
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Drinking water helps to give you clearer skin.

Water systemically flushes impurities and filters out what you don't need. A lack of water can lead to a lack of circulation, sluggish blood flow, and ultimately a mottled facial complexion. Dehydration can also increase wrinkles, lead to dry and flaky skin, make you appear tired, and increase dark underage circles. Try this: chug a 24 oz. bottle of water first thing in the morning to jump-start your daily habit.

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Drinking water helps to improve your sleep.

Each cell in your body needs water to stay properly hydrated. Going to bed dehydrated means you're more prone to wake up in the middle of the night to drink water, which means you'll be up again shortly after to pee. Your best bet? Be sure to drink most of your water before 6 pm. That way, you'll minimize trips to the loo once you've hit the hay. And,  you'll sleep better, with all your cells nice and hydrated.

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POOP TALK ALERT: Drinking water helps to keep you regular.

This isn't a surprise to many: if you don't drink enough water, you very well may be constipated - and it may be severe. Water is drawn into the intestines to increase moistness and improve the form of the bowel movement. Water also helps with intestinal motility (i.e. the motion of the ocean, i.e. the muscular contractions and movement of the intestine). So without water, our stool is hard, dry, and stuck. This begins a vicious cycle of needing assisted-aid in clearing your intestines out.

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Drinking water promotes more balanced blood sugar.

Sometimes, we eat when we're hungry and sometimes, we eat when we're actually just thirsty. Why? Because, our brains can get confused (that happens when you're dehydrated!) and sends out the hunger signal when really it should be a thirst signal. The remedy? Think about it. When you're hungry, ask yourself a quick question: when was the last time I drank any water? If it was awhile ago, do yourself a favor and have a cup or two. Wait a hot minute and then if you're still hungry, by all means: eat!

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Drinking water helps you process sugar and other toxins.

We live in a post-industrial, kinda dirty world. It can be a bad thing, but it's also just a fact that we prefer to deal with head on. This means we breathe in a lot of gunk; a lot of gunk sticks to our skin; we ingest a lot of gunk. And that's just through the air! Water helps your body more effectively move things that need to be moved out, OUT. When you're more supple on the inside, there's less of a propensity for the gunk to stick. When stuff doesn't stick, it gets flushed out, leading to greater health.

 

How to get more water into your glorious body:

Rise and Shine!

Have a 24 oz. bottle filled with water (I like Camelbak, because #nohandsma), and keep it by your bed or in the fridge. When you first wake up: drink up, buttercup! (Don't worry, you won't remember if it was annoying or not once noon hits.)

Flavor Got You Down?

Are you bored with the flavor (or lack there of) of water? We recommend adding some lemon. If flavor is the issue, there's often underlying Dampness, which lemon can help cut through. Looking for a little electrolyte kick? You'll find the recipe for our Sweet "Electric" Water at the end of this page. 

Make It a Game.

Download an app and rack up the rewards. Apps such as Daily Water, iDrated, Waterlogged, and the adorable Plant Nanny all help to keep you technologically accountable for your analog body. 

Feeling Peckish?

If you're looking to snack, first and foremost: drink at least a cup of water, if not two. Oftentimes, we misinterpret our body's call for water as one for snacks from Trader Joe's.

 

drinking water also helps to: 

  • clear up your thinking
  • improve your circulation
  • reduce the intensity and frequency of headaches
  • reduce intensity and frequency of hangovers
  • improve attention span
 

What are your thoughts? Do you have experiences with increasing your water intake that we haven't listed?